Thursday, October 16, 2014

Roy Behrens on Iowa Poet James Hearst

Hearst Talk Poster © Roy R. Behrens 2014
The James Hearst Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Lecture Series will conclude at 7 pm, Thursday, October 23, 2014, when author, teacher and graphic designer Roy Behrens addresses the audience in Mae Latta Hall at the Hearst Center, 304 West Seerley Boulevard, Cedar Falls, Iowa. Behrens’s illustrated talk, titled “Imaginary Gardens with Real Toads in Them: Learning from Iowa Poet Jim Hearst,” will be followed by a reception. The event is free and open to the public.

Roy R. Behrens is a Professor of Art and Distinguished Scholar at the University of Northern Iowa. He holds an undergraduate degree in art from the University of Northern Iowa and a graduate degree from the Rhode Island School of Design. He has taught at art schools and universities for more than 40 years. Since 1990 he has been at the University of Northern Iowa, where he teaches graphic design and design history.

In addition, Behrens has written seven books and hundreds of essays and articles on design-related subjects, most notably books and articles on art and camouflage, for which he is internationally known. He has appeared in interviews on National Public Radio, NOVA on PBS, Iowa Public Television, BBC Radio, Australian Public Radio, and has appeared in a number of documentary films. As a UNI student in the late 1960s, as well as a faculty member in the early 1970s, Behrens knew Hearst as a writer and friend.

Since April 2014, the James Hearst Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Lecture Series has featured a variety of lectures and multimedia presentations focusing on James Hearst and his body of work. They have been presented by a distinguished group of writer-educators that also includes Jonathan Stull, Scott Cawelti, Loree Rackstraw, Barbara Lounsberry, George Day, Michael Borich, and Jeremy Schraffenberger.

Farmer-poet James Hearst bequeathed his home to the city of Cedar Falls in 1983 and asked that it be used as an arts center for the community. The Hearst Center’s 25th anniversary celebration is sponsored by the Rotary Club of Cedar Falls, the Cedar Falls Art & Culture Board and 93.5 The Mix.

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Frank Lloyd Wright | Embedded Figures

FLW and Embedded Figures © Roy R. Behrens
Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Saturday, October 11, 2014

Frank Lloyd Wright at Cedar Rock | 2014

An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright (2014)
Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Friday, October 3, 2014

Frank Lloyd Wright Poster | Brandi Weis

Wright Poster © Brandi Weis (2014)
Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

To celebrate the tradition of that seminar, graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, were asked to design a series of posters that focus on Wright and his accomplishments, not limited to Cedar Rock. The poster above was designed by Brandi Weis in a course in Digital Image Design (2014).

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Frank Lloyd Wright Poster | Stephanie Davison

Wright Poster Series © Stephanie Davison (2014)
Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

To celebrate the tradition of that seminar, graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, were asked to design a series of posters that focus on Wright and his accomplishments, not limited to Cedar Rock. The poster above was designed by Stephanie Davison in a course in Digital Image Design (2014).

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Frank Lloyd Wright Poster | Joel Steger

Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

To celebrate the tradition of that seminar, graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, were asked to design a series of posters that focus on Wright and his accomplishments, not limited to Cedar Rock. The poster above was designed by Joel Steger in a course in Digital Image Design (2014).

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Frank Lloyd Wright Poster | Brad Kennedy

Wright Poster © Brad Kennedy (2014)
Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

To celebrate the tradition of that seminar, graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, were asked to design a series of posters that focus on Wright and his accomplishments, not limited to Cedar Rock. The poster above was designed by Brad Kennedy in a course in Digital Image Design (2014).

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Frank Lloyd Wright Poster | Chase Murphy

Wright Poster © Chase Murphy (2014)
Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

To celebrate the tradition of that seminar, graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, were asked to design a series of posters that focus on Wright and his accomplishments, not limited to Cedar Rock. The poster above was designed by Chase Murphy in a course in Digital Image Design (2014).

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Frank Lloyd Wright Poster | Tiffany Daubert

Wright Poster © Tiffany Daubert (2014)
Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

To celebrate the tradition of that seminar, graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, were asked to design a series of posters that focus on Wright and his accomplishments, not limited to Cedar Rock. The poster above was designed by Tiffany Daubert in a course in Digital Image Design (2014).

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Buffalo Bill in Sioux City

Mailer designed by Connie Jones (2014)

Frank Lloyd Wright Poster | Aaron Van Fossen

Wright Poster © Aaron Van Fossen (2014)
Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

To celebrate the tradition of that seminar, graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, were asked to design a series of posters that focus on Wright and his accomplishments, not limited to Cedar Rock. The poster above was designed by Aaron Van Fossen in a course in Digital Image Design (2014).

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Frank Lloyd Wright Poster | Christian Gargano

Wright Poster © Christian Gargano (2014)
Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

To celebrate the tradition of that seminar, graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, were asked to design a series of posters that focus on Wright and his accomplishments, not limited to Cedar Rock. The poster above was designed by Christian Gargano in a course in Digital Image Design (2014).

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Frank Lloyd Wright Poster | Desirée Dahl

Wright Poster © Desirée Dahl (2014)
Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

To celebrate the tradition of that seminar, graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, were asked to design a series of posters that focus on Wright and his accomplishments, not limited to Cedar Rock. The poster above was designed by Desirée Dahl in a course in Digital Image Design (2014).

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Frank Lloyd Wright Poster | Kramer Dixon

Wright Poster © Kramer Dixon (2014)
Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

To celebrate the tradition of that seminar, graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, were asked to design a series of posters that focus on Wright and his accomplishments, not limited to Cedar Rock. The poster above was designed by Kramer Dixon in a course in Digital Image Design (2014).

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Frank Lloyd Wright Poster | Kelly Cunningham

Wright Poster © Kelly Cunningham (2014)
Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

To celebrate the tradition of that seminar, graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, were asked to design a series of posters that focus on Wright and his accomplishments, not limited to Cedar Rock. The poster above was designed by Kelly Cunningham in a course in Digital Image Design (2014).

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Frank Lloyd Wright Poster | Stephanie Mathena

Wright Poster © Stephanie Mathena (2014)
Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

To celebrate the tradition of that seminar, graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, were asked to design a series of posters that focus on Wright and his accomplishments, not limited to Cedar Rock. The poster above was designed by Stephanie Mathena in a course in Digital Image Design (2014).

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Frank Lloyd Wright Poster | Danielle Shearer

Wright Poster © Danielle Shearer (2014)
Cedar Rock, originally known as the Lowell Walter Residence, was designed in 1950 by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An exemplar of his Usonian style, it is located near Quasqueton IA, and has been designated as Cedar Rock State Park. For the past ten years, the Friends of Cedar Rock organization has held an annual seminar—called An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright—in which speakers talk about Wright's life, beliefs and achievements.

To celebrate the tradition of that seminar, graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, were asked to design a series of posters that focus on Wright and his accomplishments, not limited to Cedar Rock. The poster above was designed by Danielle Shearer in a course in Digital Image Design (2014).

This year's gathering for An Afternoon with Frank Lloyd Wright will be held at 1:00 to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 18, 2014. It will take place in the American Legion Hall on Water Street (Highway W-35) in the town of Quasqueton. Admission is $10. more>>>

Monday, August 18, 2014

Jacquie Colvin | Self-Portrait Parody

Self-Portrait Parody © Jacquie Colvin c2008
In past years, as a way of acquainting my students with the intricacies of image adjustment (and modification) using Adobe Photoshop, I have sometimes used a "self-portrait parody" problem, in which students integrate photographs of themselves into public domain images of past historic works of art. An early problem, sometimes the results are amazing, sometimes not. Shown above is one of my favorite solutions (c2008), produced by Jacquie Colvin, a student who later went on to become the graphic designer at the Grout Museum District in Waterloo IA, as well as an excellent mentor for student interns who have subsequently worked with her. The artwork of which this was a parody (the pair is reproduced below) was Self-Portrait in a Straw Hall, by Elisabeth Louise Vigée Lebrun (c1782).

•••

Eudora Welty, "A Sweet Devouring" in The Eye of the Storm: Selected Essays and Reviews (New York: Vintage, 1979), p. 281—

All that summer I used to put on a second petticoat (our librarian wouldn't let you past the front door if she could see through you), ride my bicycle up the hill and "through the Capitol" (shortcut) to the library with my two read books in the basket (two was the limit you could take out at one time when you were a child and also as long as you lived), and tiptoe in ("Silence") and exchange them for two more in two minutes. Selections was no object. I coasted the two new books home, jumped out of my petticoat, read (I suppose I ate and bathed and answered questions put to me), then in all hope put my petticoat back on and rode those two books back to the library to get my next two. The librarian was the lady in town who wanted to be it. She called me by my full name and said, "Does your mother know where you are? You know good and well the fixed rule of the library: Nobody is going to come running back here with any book on the same day they took it out. Get both those things out of here and don't come back til tomorrow. And I can practically see through you."

The model (left) and the mimic

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Book Jacket Design | Austin Montelius

Book jacket © Austin Montelius
Above Proposed dust jacket for Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, designed by Austin Montelius (2014), undergraduate at  the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, in a graphic design studio course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens).

•••

Bertrand Russell, quoted in Norman Sherry, Conrad and His World (London: Thames and Hudson, 1973)—

[Joseph Conrad] thought of civilized and morally tolerable human life as a dangerous walk on a thin crust of barely cooled lava which at any moment might break and let the unwary sink into fiery depths.

•••

Anon, in Academy (February 20, 1904)—

In appearance Mr. Conrad suggests the seaman. His figure is stalwart and short, his dark beard well trimmed, and his walk nautical. Meet him near the docks and one would write him down "ship's captain" without hesitation. But his eyes, curiously distinctive and striking, mark him out from his kind. Ship captain he may be, but his eyes proclaim an artist.

Friday, May 30, 2014

Iowa Insect Series: Attention to Detail

Cicada © David Versluis and Roy R. Behrens
Above In the late 1980s, driving a U-Haul from the Deep South to Cincinnati, as we neared our destination, we began to hear a deafening buzz—and soon we ran into a boundless cloud of the seventeen-year locust, the cicada. They were everywhere—everywhere. What an indelible welcome.

Another batch of the seventeen-year cicada will soon arrive in Iowa (in another week or so, I think). Be not alarmed or overwhelmed. They're actually quite wonderful. Enjoy them while you can—they may soon go the way of the monarch, the hummingbird, the garter snake.

Long live corn and ethanol in the land of hulk and money.

And guns.

In the meantime, my good friend David Versluis has anticipated the emergence of the cicada by installing an exhibition of his and my collaborative digital montages (collages made on computer), called Insects of Iowa: Attention to Detail. See exhibit installation below.

•••

David Plowden, from "Conversation with David Plowden" in Christopher R. Rossi, ed., David Plowden's Iowa. Iowa City IA: Humanities Iowa, 2012—

When you get to Iowa, the land may be gentle and the land may be very subtle, but the sky isn't. You live out here under the weather and at your own risk, for god's sake. You may have all of the most up-to-date equipment, all the pesticides and chemicals you need—everything. But you have no control over the weather. And I think that's one of the most important things about living in this part of the world—that you could be wiped out by the weather, or you could be blessed by the weather, but you live by the weather.…

Friday, May 23, 2014

Mad Dog Poster | Sara Peters

Wrestling poster © Sara Peters (2014)
Above One of sixty-plus "Mad Dog" Vachon posters designed In the spring of 2014 by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate student Sara Peters (©2014).

•••

B.F. Skinner, Particulars of My Life. New York: New York University Press, 1984, p. 44—

She [his mother] had one ability about which there was no doubt: she could find four-leaf clovers. If she saw a patch of clover on someone's lawn, she would bend down and almost immediately come up with a stem with four leaves.  She would frequently find two or three while the rest of us searched in vain. Her satisfaction was intense, and she never overlooked an opportunity to demonstrate her skill.

Mad Dog Poster | Alexa Weilein

Wrestling poster © Alexa Weilein (2014)
Above One of sixty-plus "Mad Dog" Vachon posters designed In the spring of 2014 by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate student Alexa Weilein (©2014).

•••

Allan Sly, "Excerpts from Taped Reminiscences of Black Mountain" in Mervin Lane, ed., Black Mountain College: Sprouted Seeds: An Anthology of Personal Accounts. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1990, p. 66—

[Bauhaus artist Josef] Albers was amongst those who came [to a Black Mountain College picnic in 1935]. When it came to toasting the hot dogs over the open fire, most speared their dogs with unbent coat hangers, but Albers preferred to bend his coat hanger into a letter S—laying his hot dog on top of it, which he then held over the fire. We pointed out to him the advantage of spearing it with the prong. But he said, "I like very much the S-form." His dog fell off into the fire.

Mad Dog Poster | Emily Thompson

Wrestling poster © Emily Thompson (2014)
Above One of sixty "Mad Dog" Vachon posters designed In the spring of 2014 by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate student Emily Thompson (©2014).

•••

Edward Marsh, A Number of People: A Book of Reminiscences. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1939, p. 138—

The only drawback to her [Lady Wenlock's] companionship was her extreme deafness, which caused her to carry about a peculiar silver ear-trumpet [a horn-like hearing aid], looking like an entrée dish, or anything rather than what it was…At a luncheon in Florence she suddenly presented it to her neighbor, an Italian Duke, who gallantly filled it with green peas from a dish which a footman was handing to him at the same moment; and at one of her balls in London she left it on the piano, where it was mistaken for an ashtray, so that when the Prince of Wales took her in to supper and addressed an opening remark to her, she immediately covered him all over with cigarette ends.

Mad Dog Poster | Ekaterina Korzh

Wrestling poster © Katie Korzh (2014)
Above One of sixty "Mad Dog" Vachon posters designed In the spring of 2014 by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of two posters designed by design student Ekaterina (Katie) Korzh (©2014).

•••

Joyce Cary, The Horse's Mouth. New York: Harper and Row, 1965—

"B-but, Mr. Jimson, I w-want to be an artist."

"Of course you do," I said, "everybody does once. But they get over it, thank God, like the measles and the chickenpox. Go home and go to bed and take some hot lemonade and put on three blankets and sweat it out."

"But Mr. Jimson, there must be artists."

"Yes, and lunatics and lepers, but why go and live in an asylum before you're sent for? If you find life a bit dull at home," I said, "and want to amuse yourself, put a stick of dynamite in the kitchen fire, or shoot a policeman. Volunteer for a test pilot, or dive off Tower Bridge with five bob's worth of roman candles in each pocket. You'd get twice the fun at about one-tenth the risk."

Saturday, May 10, 2014

Collections & Recollections | Mackenzie Pape

Collections Poster © Mackenzie Pape (2014)
Above Design for a poster for a hypothetical exhibition called Collections and Recollections: Arrangements of Related Forms: Thoughts on the odd things that people collect as well as the visual patterns that come from arranging things, designed by Mackenzie Pape (2014), undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design 2, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Julian Bigelow, quoted by Ed Regis, Who Got Einstein's Office? New York: Basic Books, 1988—

[John] von Neumann [Hungarian-born American mathematician] lived in this elegant house in Princeton [NJ]. As I parked my car and walked in [for a job interview] there was this very large Great Dane bouncing around on the front lawn. I knocked on the door and von Neumann, who was a small, quiet, modest kind of a man, came to the door and bowed to me and said, "Bigelow, won't you come in," and so forth, and this dog brushed between our legs and went into the living room. He proceeded to lie down on the rug in front of everybody, and we had the entire interview—and this lasted maybe forty minutes, with the dog wandering all around the house. Towards the end of it, von Neumann asked me if I always traveled with the dog. But of course it wasn't my dog, and it wasn't his either, but von Neumann, being a diplomatic, middle-European type of person—he kindly avoided mentioning it until the end.

Collections & Recollections | Andy Snitker

Collections Poster © Andy Snitker (2014)
Above Design for a poster for a hypothetical exhibition called Collections and Recollections: Arrangements of Related Forms: Thoughts on the odd things that people collect as well as the visual patterns that come from arranging things, designed by Andy Snitker (2014), undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design 2, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Edward Marsh, Ambrosia and Small Beer. New York: Harcourt, Brace and World, 1965—

A soldier up for medical exam proved to have been wearing a truss for the past six years, and was classified as P.E. or Permanently Exempt. On his way out he gave this news to his pal, who immediately asked for the loan of the truss, which was granted. The examiner asked how long he had been wearing it, and he said, "Six years," whereupon he was classified as M.E. "What's that?" he asked. "Middle East." "How can I go to the Middle East when I've been wearing a truss for six years?" "If you can wear a truss for six years upside-down, you can jolly well ride a camel for six months."

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Collections & Recollections | Kathryn Ryherd

Collections Poster © Kathryn Ryherd
Above Design for a poster for a hypothetical exhibition called Collections and Recollections: Arrangements of Related Forms: Thoughts on the odd things that people collect as well as the visual patterns that come from arranging things, designed by Kathryn Ryherd (2014), undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design 2, as taught by Roy R. Behrens. Below CD-ROM label for her final portfolio package.

•••

Christopher Morley [seeing two hair pieces of the same small size in a store window]—

They're alike as toupées.

•••

James Joyce

Come forth, Lazarus! And he came fifth, and lost the job.

•••

Stephen Leacock

Writing? Writing's easy. All you have to do is to put down whatever occurs to you. But the occurring, now that's hard.

© Kathryn Ryherd (2014)

Collections Posters | Rhiannon Rasmussen



Collections Posters © Rhiannon Rasmussen (2014)
Above Designs for a set of three posters for a hypothetical exhibition called Collections and Recollections: Arrangements of Related Forms: Thoughts on the odd things that people collect as well as the visual patterns that come from arranging things, designed by Rhiannon Rasmussen (2014), undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design 2, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Eric Morecambe

Would you like to hear how I asked for his daughter's hand in marriage?…I said, "I would like your daughter for my wife." And he said, "But I've never met your wife. Bring her round and we'll talk about it." 

•••

Edward Marsh

[Ned Lutyens] thought as a little boy that the Lord's Prayer began with "Our Father Charles in heaven, Harold be thy name."

Collections & Recollections | Kate Green

Collections Poster © Kate Green (2014)
Above Design for a poster for a hypothetical exhibition called Collections and Recollections: Arrangements of Related Forms: Thoughts on the odd things that people collect as well as the visual patterns that come from arranging things, designed by Kate Green (2014), undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design 2, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Cedric Hardwicke, The Irreverent Memoirs of Sir Cedric Hardwicke. Garden City NY: Doubleday, 1961—

He [his father, a physician] could seldom get anyone's name right, including those of people he treated, and in later years, when I was enlarging my circle of friends, he was not above telling me, "you had a telephone call from a Mr. Vaseline"—and I could interpret that as meaning Mr. Basil Dean, the producer. And my father had a most distinctive rechristening for Tallulah Bankhead; she was known to him as Tarara Buncombe in later years.

The Grand Piano | Aaron Van Fossen

Grand Piano Timeline © Aaron Van Fossen (2014)
Above Proposal for an infographic timeline about the development of the grand piano, designed by Aaron Van Fossen, undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design 2, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Louis Agassiz, in Lane Cooper, ed., Louis Agassiz as a Teacher (1917)—

In 1847 I gave an address at Newton, Massachusetts, before a Teachers' Institute conducted by Horace Mann. My subject was grasshoppers. I passed around a large jar of these insects, and made every teacher take one and hold it while I was speaking. If any one dropped the insect, I stopped till he picked it up. This was at that time a great innovation, and excited much laughter and derision. There can be no true progress in the teaching of natural science until such methods become general.

Collections & Recollections 3 | Riley Place

Collections Poster © Riley Place (2014)
Above Design for a poster for a hypothetical exhibition called Collections and Recollections: Arrangements of Related Forms: Thoughts on the odd things that people collect as well as the visual patterns that come from arranging things, designed by Riley Place (2014), undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design 2, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Anthony Burgess, Little Wilson and Big God. London: Weidenfeld & Nicholson, 1987, p. 69—

Mr. Magoo bids the normally sighted, or the smug spectacle-wearers, laugh at uncorrected myopia. He shakes hands with a bear he takes to be Dr. Milmoss, thinks a skyscraper scaffolding a restaurant, believes the seabed to be a motorway, but he always comes through unscathed and disabused. My adventures have been less sensational. I once entered a bank in Stratford-on-Avon and ordered a drink. I have waved back at people waving at someone else. There was an electric sky sign in All Saints, Manchester, which read UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE and I read as UPROARIOUSLY FUNNY. In the army I failed to salute officers and, fiercely rebuked, then saluted privates. I have spoken to women in the streets I thought I knew and thus got to know them…The myopic eye is not lazy; it is too busy creating meanings out of vague données. Compensation for lifelong myopia comes in old age; presbyopia supervenes on the condition and cancels it. I am forced now into perfect sight and I am not sure like it.

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Collections & Recollections 2 | Riley Place

Collections Poster © Riley Place (2014)
Above Design for a poster for a hypothetical exhibition called Collections and Recollections: Arrangements of Related Forms: Thoughts on the odd things that people collect as well as the visual patterns that come from arranging things, designed by Riley Place (2014), undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design 2, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Colin M. Turbayne, in The Myth of Metaphor. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1971—

Naming, numbering, or sorting things is not just noticing what is out there fixed and settled. Nevertheless, there are arguments about sorting. These are mainly verbal. There are few about tigers and lions. There may be some about "tigers" and "lions." We do not remain in disagreement for long about the marks of the tiger, and that lion-like animal. Is it a sort of tiger or a sort of lion? Or is it a new sort? The convenient way chosen for the tigron was the last. We can make new sorts as we please. But those that we have grown accustomed to, we tend to think are determined and set out by nature. These also were grouped and named in an arbitrary manner. They might have been sorted in a different way.

Collections & Recollections | Riley Place

Collections Poster © Riley Place (2014)
Above Design for a poster for a hypothetical exhibition called Collections and Recollections: Arrangements of Related Forms: Thoughts on the odd things that people collect as well as the visual patterns that come from arranging things, designed by Riley Place (2014), undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design 2, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Mark Van Doren, in The Autobiography of Mark Van Doren. New York: Greenwood Press, 1968—

A boy named Eddie Shell came one afternoon to play with Frank [his brother] and me, and at the hour of going home did not know how to do so. This is a malady that afflicts all children, but my mother was not sure how she should handle it in Eddie's case. She consulted us secretly as to whether he should be asked to stay for supper; we thought not, so she hinted to him that his mother might be expecting him. He was so slow in acting upon the hint that we were all in despair and began to feel guilty because we had not pressed him to stay. What I remember now is Eddie standing at last on the other side of the screen door and trying to say goodbye as if he meant it. My mother said warmly: "Well, Eddie, come and see us again." Whereupon he opened the door and walked in.

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Illustrated Calendar | Winston Kearney

Illustrated calendar © Winston Kearney (2014)
Above Proposal for a page from an illustrated calendar, using digital montages in response to poignant quotes, designed by Winston Kearney, undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design 1, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

From H.G. Barnett, Innovation: The Basis of Cultural Change. NY: McGraw-Hill, 1953—

They [artists and designers] strive deliberately to transcend the commonplace—that is to say, the habitual—configurations rather than to conform to them. In this, artists do not differ from inventors; and they are similarly constrained by the number of available configurations within their cultural tradition and the degree to which the internal cohesion of these habitual configurations resists their efforts to break them down and reintegrate them into new units.

Russian Space Program | Austin Montelius

Timeline © Austin Montelius (2014)
Above Proposal for an infographic timeline about the Russian space program, designed by Austin Montelius, undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design 2, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Arthur Koestler in The Act of Creation. NY: Macmillan, 1964—

…Einstein's space is no closer to reality than Van Gogh's sky.…The scientist's discoveries impose his own order on chaos, as the composer or painter imposes his; an order that always refers to limited aspects of reality, and is biased by the observer's frame of reference, which differs from period to period, as a Rembrandt nude differs from a nude by Manet.

Friday, April 11, 2014

UNI Graphic Design Portfolio Night | 2014

Poster © Sara Heffernen 2014
Above Poster and information about this year's annual Graphic Design Portfolio Night at the University of Northern Iowa.

•••

Abraham Maslow, Toward a Psychology of Being. New York: Van Nostrand, 1968—

I learned from her and others like her that a first-rate soup is more creative than a second-rate painting, and that, generally, cooking or parenting or making a home could be creative while poetry need not be; it could be uncreative.

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Block of Postage Stamps | Tanner Heinrichs

Block of postage stamps © Tanner Heinrichs
Above and below Proposal for a block of postage stamps for an imaginary country called the Republic of Villanella, designed by Tanner Heinrichs, graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design I, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Leslie Hall, quoted in Steven J. Zeitlin, et al., eds., A Celebration of American Family Folklore (NYC: Pantheon Books, 1982), p. 88—

About a year after my grandfather died I took a trip across the country and stopped in St Louis to see my grandmother. It turned out that they had a lot of money tucked away here and there—money under the mattress, in different banks, fifties here and there. It all added up to close to one hundred thousand dollars. When I stopped again on the way back, I went into the house and my grandmother says, "Oh, Leslie, I have something for you, upstairs. I had thought about giving it to you on your way across the country." And here I was, old greedy me thinking that maybe she had found a hundred dollar bill under the mattress and was thinking of giving it to me. So I followed her upstairs, toward the bedroom where she all of a sudden makes a cut into the bathroom, and she opens the cabinet and pulls out these two huge bottles of mouthwash and she says, "Your grandfather was going to use these but he didn't get a chance."

Labels, Stamps, Currency | Blake Schlawin

Luggage labels © Blake Schlawin 2014
Above and below Proposals for luggage labels, postage stamps and currency for an imaginary country called Sequitur, designed by Blake Schlawin, graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design I, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

William H. Gass, interviewed in Tom LeClair and Larry McGaffery, eds., Anything Can Happen (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1983), p. 158—

I think contemporary fiction is divided between those who are still writing performatively and those who are not. Writing for voice, in which you imagine a performance in the auditory sense going on, is traditional and dying. The new mode is not performative and  not auditory. It's destined for the printed page, and you are really supposed to read it the way they teach you to read in speed reading. You are supposed to crisscross the page with your eye, getting references and gists; you are supposed to see it flowing on the page, and not sound it in the head. If you do sound it, it is so bad you can hardly proceed… By the mouth for the ear: that's the way I like to write. I can still admire the other—the way I admire surgeons, broncobusters, and tight ends. As writing, it is that foreign to me.

Block of stamps © Blake Schlawin 2014
Currency © Blake Schlawin 2014

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Postage & Currency | Andrew Struik

Block of stamps © Andrew Struik (2014)
Above and below Proposals for postage stamps and currency for an imaginary country called Fiasco, designed by Andrew Struik, graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a class called Graphic Design I, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Thomas Berger, "Touring Western Europe, 1956: Excerpts from a Journal" in an issue of Antaeus devoted to journals, notebooks and diaries. No 61, Autumn 1988, p. 43—

Taken by Dr. Haas to find [Sigmund] Freud's house. He was not sure of the number and stopped at one point on the Berggasse to ask a woman who is sweeping the sidewalk, "Could you tell us which of these houses was Freud's?" She had no idea. "Doctor Freud?" No, sorry. She went on sweeping. "I'm sure it's along here somewhere," Dr. Haas told me. We were about to return to the car when he had a bright idea. "Actually," he said to the woman, "it was Professor Freud." "Ja!" said she. "Professor Freud lived just there," pointing.

Currency © Andrew Struik (2014)

Postage & Currency | Tony McDermott

Block of stamps © Tony McDermott (2014)
Above and below Proposals for postage stamps and currency for an imaginary country called Sfumato, designed by Tony McDermott, graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a class called Graphic Design I, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Polly Gardner, quoted in Elizabeth Stone, Black Sheep and Kissing Cousins: How Our Family Stories Shape Us. New York: Times Books, 1988, p. 61—

In town, they called my grandfather Applejack. Do you known what applejack is? It's before moonshine becomes moonshine. If you won't wait for it to ferment, it's applejack. My grandfather just drank a whole lot of applejack. And dated other women. Finally my grandmother said, "Enough is enough," and she left him, which was pretty strange for the 1920s. She raised her six children herself. She did people's laundry by night and was waitress at the Greyhound bus station in the day. The one poignant note: even though she'd thrown him out, she did his laundry for him until the day he died.

Currency © Tony McDermott (2014)

Postage & Currency | Abby Michael

Block of stamps © Abby Michael (2014)
Above and below Proposals for postage stamps and currency for an imaginary country called the Republic of Lustspiel, designed by Abby Michael, graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design I, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

John Updike, The Centaur (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1963), pp. 80-81—

"The Founding Fathers," he explained, "in their wisdom decided that children were an unnatural strain on parents. So they provided jails called schools, equipped with tortures called an education. School is where you go between when your parents can't take you and industry can't keep you. [As a teacher] I am a paid keeper of Society's unusables—the lame, the halt, the insane, and the ignorant. The only incentive I can give you, kid, to behave yourself is this: If you don't buckle down and learn something, you'll be as dumb as I am, and you'll have to teach school to earn a living."

Currency © Abby Michael (2014)