Friday, April 11, 2014

UNI Graphic Design Portfolio Night | 2014

Poster © Sara Heffernen 2014
Above Poster and information about this year's annual Graphic Design Portfolio Night at the University of Northern Iowa.

•••

Abraham Maslow, Toward a Psychology of Being. New York: Van Nostrand, 1968—

I learned from her and others like her that a first-rate soup is more creative than a second-rate painting, and that, generally, cooking or parenting or making a home could be creative while poetry need not be; it could be uncreative.

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Digital Dog | Roy R. Behrens

© Roy R. Behrens 2014
Above Digital montage dog by Roy R. Behrens, as published in Robynne Rae, 1000 Dog Portraits. ME: Rockport Publishers, 2014. ISNB 9781592539017.

•••

Edgar Tafel, Years with Frank Lloyd Wright: Apprentice to Genius. Mineola NY: Dover Publications, 1985, p. 22—

When he [Wright] was in Japan, working on the Imperial Hotel, he ordered some new collars from a local haberdasher. He explained how he wanted them made, and a sample was sent for his approval. He scribbled in red: "OK, FLLW." When the collars were delivered, every one was monogrammed "OK, FLLW" in red ink.

Block of Postage Stamps | Tanner Heinrichs

Block of postage stamps © Tanner Heinrichs
Above and below Proposal for a block of postage stamps for an imaginary country called the Republic of Villanella, designed by Tanner Heinrichs, graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design I, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Leslie Hall, quoted in Steven J. Zeitlin, et al., eds., A Celebration of American Family Folklore (NYC: Pantheon Books, 1982), p. 88—

About a year after my grandfather died I took a trip across the country and stopped in St Louis to see my grandmother. It turned out that they had a lot of money tucked away here and there—money under the mattress, in different banks, fifties here and there. It all added up to close to one hundred thousand dollars. When I stopped again on the way back, I went into the house and my grandmother says, "Oh, Leslie, I have something for you, upstairs. I had thought about giving it to you on your way across the country." And here I was, old greedy me thinking that maybe she had found a hundred dollar bill under the mattress and was thinking of giving it to me. So I followed her upstairs, toward the bedroom where she all of a sudden makes a cut into the bathroom, and she opens the cabinet and pulls out these two huge bottles of mouthwash and she says, "Your grandfather was going to use these but he didn't get a chance."

Labels, Stamps, Currency | Blake Schlawin

Luggage labels © Blake Schlawin 2014
Above and below Proposals for luggage labels, postage stamps and currency for an imaginary country called Sequitur, designed by Blake Schlawin, graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design I, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

William H. Gass, interviewed in Tom LeClair and Larry McGaffery, eds., Anything Can Happen (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1983), p. 158—

I think contemporary fiction is divided between those who are still writing performatively and those who are not. Writing for voice, in which you imagine a performance in the auditory sense going on, is traditional and dying. The new mode is not performative and  not auditory. It's destined for the printed page, and you are really supposed to read it the way they teach you to read in speed reading. You are supposed to crisscross the page with your eye, getting references and gists; you are supposed to see it flowing on the page, and not sound it in the head. If you do sound it, it is so bad you can hardly proceed… By the mouth for the ear: that's the way I like to write. I can still admire the other—the way I admire surgeons, broncobusters, and tight ends. As writing, it is that foreign to me.

Block of stamps © Blake Schlawin 2014
Currency © Blake Schlawin 2014

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Postage & Currency | Andrew Struik

Block of stamps © Andrew Struik (2014)
Above and below Proposals for postage stamps and currency for an imaginary country called Fiasco, designed by Andrew Struik, graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a class called Graphic Design I, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Thomas Berger, "Touring Western Europe, 1956: Excerpts from a Journal" in an issue of Antaeus devoted to journals, notebooks and diaries. No 61, Autumn 1988, p. 43—

Taken by Dr. Haas to find [Sigmund] Freud's house. He was not sure of the number and stopped at one point on the Berggasse to ask a woman who is sweeping the sidewalk, "Could you tell us which of these houses was Freud's?" She had no idea. "Doctor Freud?" No, sorry. She went on sweeping. "I'm sure it's along here somewhere," Dr. Haas told me. We were about to return to the car when he had a bright idea. "Actually," he said to the woman, "it was Professor Freud." "Ja!" said she. "Professor Freud lived just there," pointing.

Currency © Andrew Struik (2014)

Postage & Currency | Tony McDermott

Block of stamps © Tony McDermott (2014)
Above and below Proposals for postage stamps and currency for an imaginary country called Sfumato, designed by Tony McDermott, graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a class called Graphic Design I, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

Polly Gardner, quoted in Elizabeth Stone, Black Sheep and Kissing Cousins: How Our Family Stories Shape Us. New York: Times Books, 1988, p. 61—

In town, they called my grandfather Applejack. Do you known what applejack is? It's before moonshine becomes moonshine. If you won't wait for it to ferment, it's applejack. My grandfather just drank a whole lot of applejack. And dated other women. Finally my grandmother said, "Enough is enough," and she left him, which was pretty strange for the 1920s. She raised her six children herself. She did people's laundry by night and was waitress at the Greyhound bus station in the day. The one poignant note: even though she'd thrown him out, she did his laundry for him until the day he died.

Currency © Tony McDermott (2014)

Postage & Currency | Abby Michael

Block of stamps © Abby Michael (2014)
Above and below Proposals for postage stamps and currency for an imaginary country called the Republic of Lustspiel, designed by Abby Michael, graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa, in a course called Graphic Design I, as taught by Roy R. Behrens.

•••

John Updike, The Centaur (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1963), pp. 80-81—

"The Founding Fathers," he explained, "in their wisdom decided that children were an unnatural strain on parents. So they provided jails called schools, equipped with tortures called an education. School is where you go between when your parents can't take you and industry can't keep you. [As a teacher] I am a paid keeper of Society's unusables—the lame, the halt, the insane, and the ignorant. The only incentive I can give you, kid, to behave yourself is this: If you don't buckle down and learn something, you'll be as dumb as I am, and you'll have to teach school to earn a living."

Currency © Abby Michael (2014)

Saturday, March 29, 2014

Art History Symposium | Alex Rogers

Poster © Alex Rogers (2014)
Above Poster designed by graphic design student Alex Rogers for the 2014 Art History Symposium, hosted by the Art History faculty at the University of Northern Iowa.

Art History Symposium | Rhiannon Rasmussen

Poster © Rhiannon Rasmussen (2014)
Above Poster designed by graphic design student Rhiannon Rasmussen for the 2014 Art History Symposium, hosted by the Art History faculty at the University of Northern Iowa.

Friday, March 21, 2014

Collections Poster | Evan Seuren

Poster © Evan Seuren, UNI graphic design student (2014)
Frances Kilvert in William Plomer, ed., Kilvert's Diary. London: Jonathan Cape, 1960, p. 298—

One evening she [Dame Matthews] saw one of the farm men [named John] steal a pound of butter out of the dairy and put it into his hat, at the same moment clapping his hat upon his head.

"John," called the Dame. "John, come here. I want to speak to you." John came, carefully keeping his hat on his head. The Dame ordered some ale to be heated for him and bade him sit down in front of the roaring fire. John thanked his mistress and said he would have the ale another time, as he wanted to go home at once.

"No, John. Sit you down by the fire and drink some hot ale. 'Tis a cold night and I want to speak to you about the kine [cows]."

The miserable John, daring neither to take off his hat nor go without his mistress's leave, sat before the scorching fire drinking his hot ale til the melting butter in his hat began to run down all over his face. The Dame eyed him with malicious fun. "Now, John," she said, "you may go. I won't charge you anything for the butter."

Collections Poster | Rachael Bair

Poster © Rachael Bair, UNI graphic design student (2014)
Marvin Bell in "Pages" in A Marvin Bell Reader: Selected Poetry and Prose. NH: Middlebury College Press / University Press of New England, 1994, p. 88—

Arriving at the dentist's office, he is only two minutes late, so he is surprised to see two others in the waiting room and several coats hung from the hat tree. He takes a magazine and sits down to wait. When the receptionists appears, she greets him as if they were merely passing on the street. As if she expects him to explain himself for lingering. He only says hello and returns to his reading. But she says he must have made a mistake, his appointment is for later that day. That makes no sense to him. He has the appointment written down in three places. Suddenly he remembers. I know what it is, he says, I have a haircut appointment! He leaves the waiting room in a good humor and runs to his barber. When he explains why he is late, the barber says, Well, you knew it was something above the neck.

Collections Poster | Travis Tjelmeland

Poster © Travis Tjelmeland, UNI graphic design student (2014)
Flower shop owner, quoted in Abraham Pais, Einstein Lived Here. NY: Oxford University Press, 1994, p. 26—

When he [Albert Einstein] would pay his bill [at a flower shop in Princeton NJ] with his check I would save them. I thought the autograph was worth more than the check. When I had accumulated quite a few, Dr. Einstein telephoned and asked if I would cash the checks, so he could balance his check book.

He also offered to provide us with as many of his autographs as I wished.

Collections Poster | Aaron Van Fossen

Poster © Aaron Van Fossen, UNI student designer (2014)
John Hersey (recalling his summer as a secretarial assistant to American novelist Sinclair Lewis) in "My Summer with Sinclair Lewis" in Kai Erikson, ed., Encounters. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1989, p. 51—

Lewis's life was in a mess. But I was to have a marvelous summer, oblivious of his suffering. He never took a single drink while I worked for him; I remained in total ignorance of his history [of alcoholism]. I saw a surface that was gentle, kindly, boyish, and vividly entertaining. He treated me as a young friend, insisting that I call him Red. My work was fun. Taking his rapid dictation and reading it back to type it was like doing a crossword puzzle: I caught every fourth word with a squiggle of Gregg [shorthand] and had to figure out what went between. "If you want my autograph," he would dictate in a note to a fan, "you must send me a self-addressed envelope with a postage stamp on it"—chuckling at the idea that I would have to address an envelope and put a stamp on it to send the note.

Thursday, February 27, 2014

UNI Art History Symposium | Zach Bird

Art History Symposium Poster © Zach Bird 2014
Above In a graphic design course this semester (in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa), students were invited to design a "call for submissions" of art history research papers. The winning papers will be read at the department's annual Art History Symposium on Friday, April 4, 2014. The top three posters were chosen by the university's Art History faculty, including this one, designed by Zach Bird.

UNI Art History Symposium | Alex Rogers

Art History Symposium Poster © Alex Rogers 2014
Above In a graphic design course this semester (in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa), students were invited to design a "call for submissions" of art history research papers. The winning papers will be read at the department's annual Art History Symposium on Friday, April 4, 2014. The top three posters were chosen by the university's Art History faculty, including this one, designed by Alex Rogers.

UNI Art History Symposium | Jake Earp


Art History Symposium Poster © Jake Earp 2014
Above In a graphic design course this semester (in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa), students were invited to design a "call for submissions" of art history research papers. The winning papers will be read at the department's annual Art History Symposium on Friday, April 4, 2014. The top three posters were chosen by the university's Art History faculty, including this one, designed by Jake Earp.

•••

Alan Coren, The Sanity Inspector

Apart from cheese and tulips, the main product of the country [Holland] is advocaat, a drink made from lawyers.

Sunday, February 23, 2014

Iowa Snowstorms and Beyond

Conference program booklet © 2005
Above It was fun to run across this recently, a reminder of a wonderful weekend from almost ten years ago. It's the program booklet (with an exquisite parody logo designed by Argentine architect Maria Buteler Tilliard, who was a student at the time) for the graphic design faculty's first non-funded conference at the University of Northern Iowa. It was an exhausting delightful success, so much that the following year it prompted us to improvise the first international conference on art and camouflage in 2006 (non-funded as well), which was as much or more a success.

•••

Alfredo Veiravé (Argentine poet), "Memories of Iowa City and the international Writing Program" in Paul Engle, et al., The World Comes to Iowa. Ames IA: Iowa State University Press, 1987, pp. 195-196—

Starting in September, I already began thinking about what snow in Iowa would be like. As autumn wore on and winter came, that promise was approaching…until one morning when I woke up I heard a noise at the bedroom window. It sounded like a bird lightly touching the glass. While I was coming fully awake I had memories of similar sounds, such as that of some strange animal rubbing against the glass. And suddenly I remembered the snow, and I jumped out of bed and went to the window. There it was: snow. During the night the whole countryside had changed to white as if by magic. I was so excited that we had to get dressed and run out into the street to feel the light, magical Iowa snow.

Thursday, February 20, 2014

Long Midwestern Winters

Story Illustration © Kim Behm
Above Short story illustration by Iowa-based artist Kim Behm, who teaches at Hawkeye Community College, Waterloo IA.

•••

Richard Critchfield, Those Days: An American Album (New York: Dell, 1986), p. 156—

But the snow, the unchanging blackness and whiteness of it, the bitter cold, the ceaseless wind—it could give you a really bad case of "cabin fever" if you let it. Father [a country doctor] used to tell about finding patients in remote farmhouses, most of them women, who'd made themselves ill with depression and loneliness over the long winter. All the early settlers had tales of women on isolated homesteads going mad. Even our farm, just a half mile south and two miles west of Hunter, could get pretty lonely. In the dead of night the sound of a coyote—three short yelps and a long howling wail—can be just about the most desolate sound there is.

Sunday, February 9, 2014

Theatre Poster | Michelle Watson

Theatre poster © Michelle Watson 2011
Above Theatre poster designed by Michelle Watson, completed while an undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa.

•••

Stanley Elkin, Early Elkin (Flint MI: Bamberger Books, 1985)—

We read, I've told my classes, to die, not entirely certain what I mean but sure it has something to do with being alone, shutting the world out, doing books like beads, a mantra, the flu. Some perfect, hermetic concentration sealed as canned goods or pharmaceuticals. It is, I think, not so much a way of forgetting ourselves as engaging the totality of our attentions, as racing-car drivers or mountain climbers engage them, as surgeons and chess masters do. It's fine, precise, detailed work, the infinitely small motor management of diamond cutters and safecrackers that we do in our heads…I haven't said it here, am almost ashamed to own up, but once I opened books slowly, stately, plump imaginary orchestras going off in my head like overtures, like music behind the opening credits in films, humming the title page, whistling the copyright, turning myself into producer and pit band, usher and audience.

Saturday, February 8, 2014

Theatre Poster | Erich Bollmann

Theatre poster © Erich Bollmann
Above Theatre poster designed by Erich Bollmann (Los Angeles), completed in an undergraduate graphic design course at the University of Northern Iowa.

•••

Mary McCarthy, Memories of a Catholic Girlhood (NY: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1957), p. 5—

It is our parents, normally, who not only teach us our family history but who set us straight on our own childhood recollections, telling us that this cannot have happened the way we think it did and that that, on the other hand, did occur, just as we remember it, in such and such a summer when So-and-So was our nurse. My own son, Reuel, for instance, used to be convinced that Mussolini had been thrown off a bus in North Truro, on Cape Cod, during the war. This memory goes back to one morning in 1943 when, as a young child, he was waiting with his father and me beside the road in Wellfleet to put a departing guest on the bus to Hyannis. The bus came through, and the bus driver leaned down to shout the latest piece of news: "They've thrown Mussolini out." Today, Reuel knows that Mussolini was never ejected from a Massachusetts bus, and he also knows how he got that impression.

Thursday, February 6, 2014

Theatre Poster | Amanda Wallace

Theatre poster © Amanda Wallace (2010)
Above Theatre poster design by Amanda Wallace (Golwitzer), completed as an undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa.

•••

Ludwig Börne, The Art of Becoming An Original Writer in Three Days (said to be one of the factors that influenced Sigmund Freud in his adoption of free association)—

Take a few sheets of paper and for three days on end write down, without fabrication or hypocrisy, everything that comes into your head. Write down what you think of yourself, of your wife, of the Turkish War, of Goethe…and when three days have passed you will be quite out of your senses with astonishment at the new and unheard of thoughts you have had. This is the art of becoming an original writer in three days.

•••

George Ellis (the twelve months of the year)—

Snowy, Flowy, Blowy,
Showery, Flowery, Bowery,
Hoppy, Croppy, Droppy,
Breezy, Sneezy, Freezy.

•••

Alan Bennett (Beyond the Fringe)—

We started out trying to set up a small anarchist community, but people wouldn't obey the rules.

Sunday, February 2, 2014

Digital Illustration | John Vorwald

Story illustration © John Vorwald
Above Digital short story illustration by John Vorwald, completed as an undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa.

•••

Melvin Fishman—

The holes in your Swiss cheese are somebody else's Swiss cheese [cf. figure-ground].

•••

Norah Phillips

On the subject of confused people, I liked the store detective who said he'd seen a lot of people so confused that they'd stolen things, but never one so confused that they'd paid twice.

•••

D.H. Lawrence (The Later DHL)—

No absolute is going to make the lion lie down with the lamb unless the lamb is inside.

•••

Woody Allen (Without Feathers)—

The lion and the calf shall lie down together but the calf won't get much sleep.

•••

Herbert Berbohm Tree (BT)—

The only man who wasn't spoilt by being lionized was Daniel.

Saturday, February 1, 2014

Self-Portrait Parody | Evan Seuren

Self-portrait parody © Evan Seuren
Above Digital self-portrait by Evan Seuren (a parody of Triple Self-Portrait by American illustrator Norman Rockwell (1960)), completed in an undergraduate graphic design course at the University of Northern Iowa.

•••

Guy Browning (The Guardian 1999)—

A shoal of a million fish might not be able to write Romeo and Juliet but they can change direction as one in the blink of an eye. Using language a human team leader can give an order to a team of six and have it interpreted in six completely different ways.

•••

Tony Benn (The Independent 1997)—

We should put spin-doctors in spin clinics, where they can meet other spin patients and be treated by spin consultants. The rest of us can get on with the proper democratic process.

•••

Stuart Davis (1940)—

An artist who has travelled on a steam train, driven an automobile, or flown in an airplane doesn't feel the same way about form and space as one who has not.

Fillm Poster | Kenny Meisner

Film poster © Kenny Meisner
Above Proposed film poster by Kenny Meisner, completed as an undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa.

•••

Charles Dickens (Nicholas Nickleby)—

"What's the water in French, sir?" "L'eau," replied Nicholas. "Ah!" said Mr. Lillyvick, shaking his head mournfully, "I thought as much. Lo, eh? I don't think anything of that language—nothing at all."

•••

Billy Wilder (Avanti)—

I don't object to foreigners speaking a foreign language: I just wish they'd all speak the same foreign language.

•••

G.K. Chesterton

I regard golf as an expensive way of playing marbles.

Sunday, January 26, 2014

Promotional Poster | Kellie Heath

Promotional poster © Kellie Heath (2013)
Above Proposal for a promotional poster for the College of Humanities, Arts and Sciences (CHAS) at the University of Northern Iowa. Designed by undergraduate graphic design student Kellie Heath (2013).

•••

Mae West (I'm No Angel)—

When I'm good I'm very good, but when I'm bad I'm better.

...

Anthony Powell (Hearing Secret Harmonies)—

One of the worst things about life is not how nasty the nasty people are. You know that already. It is how nasty the nice people can be.

...

Jonathan Lynn and Antony Jay (Yes, Prime Minister) [cf. Donald Rumsfeld]—

So that means you need to know things even when you don't need to know them. You need to know them not because you need to know them but because you need to know whether or not you need to know. And if you don't need to know you still need to know so that you know that there was no need to know.

Synergistic Postage | Morgan Moe

Above (and below) Proposal for a synergistic postage stamp (2012) designed by Morgan Moe, in an undergraduate graphic design course at the University of Northern Iowa.

•••

French poet Gérard de Nerval, when asked about his habit of taking his pet lobster (named Thibault) for a walk in the royal gardens—

Why is a lobster any more ridiculous than a dog…or any other creature one chooses to take for a walk? I have a liking for lobsters: they are peaceful and solemn, they know the secrets of the sea, they do not bark, and they do not eat into the essential privacy of ones soul the way dogs do…Goethe had an aversion to dogs, and he was not mad.

Postage stamp © Morgan Moe (2012)
...

Frank Muir (You Can't Have Your Kayak and Heat It)—

Dogs, like horses, are quadrupeds. That is to say, they have four rupeds, one at each corner, on which they walk.

...

J.B. Morton (By the Way)—

Dr Strabismus (Whom God Preserve) of Utrecht is carrying out research work with a view to crossing salmon with mosquitoes. He says it will mean a bite every time for fishermen.

Theatre Poster | Sarah Schultz

Theatre poster by Sarah Schultz © 2011
Above Proposed poster for the theatrical production of The Foursome at the Waterloo Community Playhouse (Waterloo IA). Designed by Sarah Schultz, while she was an undergraduate graphic design student at the University of Northern Iowa (2011).

•••

Richard Brinsley Sheridan—

Won't you come into the garden? I would like my roses to see you.



James Thurber (cartoon caption)—

You wait here and I'll bring the etchings down.



Charles Dickens (Nicholas Nickleby)—

My pa requests me to write to you. The doctors considering it doubtful whether he will ever recover the use of his legs which prevents his holding a pen.

Wednesday, December 25, 2013

George Carlin on Diminished Choices

Calendar page © Dana Potter (2013)
Above Layout for a calendar page (its theme determined by a quote) by Dana Potter, graphic design student, Department of Art, University of Northern Iowa.

•••

George Carlin, in an interview in David Jay Brown, Conversations on the Edge of the Apocalypse (NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), p. 191—

We're given many choices to distract us from the fact that our real choices have been diminished in number. Two political parties. Maybe three or four large banks now. Credit card companies, just a couple, a handful. Newspapers, reduced. Ownership of media, reduced, down to five or six companies now. Big stock brokerage firms, reduced in number. In all of these important things we have less choice. Then we're distracted with these frivolous choices: 21 flavors of ice cream, 35 flavors of popcorn. You see specialty shops with 35 flavors of popcorn, like chocolate walnut popcorn. These are absurd distractions from what we are doing to ourselves…

Blind Leading the Blonde

Calendar page (2013) ©Rob Bauer
Above Layout for a calendar page (its theme determined by a quote) by Rob Bauer, graphic design student in the Department of Art, University of Northern Iowa.

•••

Dr. Peter H. Gott, "Health Q&A" in The Fresno Bee (Fresno CA), 4 May 2000, p. E-6—

After my father's bypass surgery, he felt so dreadful that he insisted his doctor stop most of his medication. Thereafter, he felt fine. While such a drastic action is not everyone's cup of tea, you would have to know my father to appreciate how relentlessly stubborn he was. He claimed to have "accurately misunderstood" his doctors, didn't want them to put [all] his "aches in one basket," was fearful of "dying for nothing," and wished as an adult to be "the blind leading the blonde."

Robert Craft in Stravinsky: Chronicle of a Friendship (Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press, 1994), p. 344—

[The poet W.H. Auden] says that in the train club car on his way to lecture at Yale, some students sent him a note: "We can't stand it a minute longer: are you Carl Sandburg?" He wrote back: "You have spoiled mother's day."

Sunday, December 8, 2013

Dan Gable Graphics | UNI Poster Exhibit

Above are installation views of about eighty posters currently on display at the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Dan Gable Museum at 303 Jefferson Street in Waterloo IA. As explained in earlier posts, these posters were produced by undergraduate students in a beginning course in graphic design, in the Department of Art at the University Northern Iowa. They commemorate the achievements (as both a wrestler and a coach) of Iowa-born Olympic wrestler Dan Gable, shown here in a recent photo (by museum director Kyle Klingman), when he stopped by to see the posters.

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Graphic Design | Dan Gable Poster Project

Poster by Austin Von Ehwegen
Above In the fall semester of 2013, graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa designed more than one hundred posters to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. These were produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), and are currently on exhibit at the museum. Shown here is one of three posters designed by undergraduate designer Austin Von Ehwegen (©2013). Other student posters can be viewed online here and here.

Friday, November 22, 2013

Dan Gable Poster | Chelsea Reicks

Above One of more than one hundred posters designed by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate designer Chelsea Reicks (©2013).

Dan Gable Poster | Mackenzie Kane

Above One of more than one hundred posters designed by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate designer Mackenzie Kane (©2013).

Dan Gable Poster | Riley Place

Above One of more than one hundred posters designed by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate designer Riley Place (©2013).

Dan Gable Poster | Kelsey Frerichs

Above One of more than one hundred posters designed by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate designer Kelsey Frerichs (©2013).

Dan Gable Poster | Duke Dohrn

Above One of more than one hundred posters designed by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate designer Duke Dohrn (©2013).

Dan Gable Poster | Maicol Josephs

Above One of more than one hundred posters designed by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate designer Maicol Josephs (©2013).

Dan Gable Poster | Josie Wolter

Above One of more than one hundred posters designed by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate designer Josie Wolter (©2013).

Dan Gable Poster | Abby Bachman

Above One of more than one hundred posters designed by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate designer Abby Bachman (©2013).

Dan Gable Poster | Emily Morrison

Above One of more than one hundred posters designed by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate designer Emily Morrison (©2013).

Dan Gable Poster | Alexander Rogers

Above One of more than one hundred posters designed by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate designer Alexander Rogers (©2013).

Dan Gable Poster | Kate Green

Above One of more than one hundred posters designed by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate designer Kate Green (©2013).

Dan Gable Poster | Robert Bauer

Above One of more than one hundred posters designed by graphic design students in the Department of Art at the University of Northern Iowa, to promote the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo IA. Produced as a community project in a beginning graphic design course (as taught by Roy R. Behrens), this is one of three posters designed by undergraduate designer Robert Bauer (©2013).